Seminar Series – Current Topics in Law

SEMINAR SERIES – CURRENT TOPICS IN LAW

Summer 2016 – Special Seminar Series: Missouri’s Role in the Law of Desegregation.

Please join us for a very special offering of our legal seminar series.  Take a look at how local cases changed the course of history in the country, through the eyes of an attorney.  Thomas E. Wack, a St. Louis lawyer, will present a three-part series looking at Missouri’s role in the law of segregation and desegregation. Each seminar will include time for Q & A.

Brought to you by the U.S. Courts and the Judicial Learning Center, Inc.  All seminars held at the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. Courthouse in downtown St. Louis.

If registering individually, programs are $5.00 each.  Register for all 3 sessions for only $11.00, a savings of $4.00!

Light refreshments will be served.

Contact OASIS at 314-862-4859 ext. 24 to register or for more information, or click HERE to visit their website.

 

Dred and Harriet Scott – Missouri State Court Cases

Part 1 of a 3 part seminar series on legal history.  The first session of the series will cover the lives of Dred Scott, his wife and children, and their efforts to obtain emancipation from slavery in the Missouri state courts.

  • Presented by Thomas E. Wack
  • Friday, June 17, 2016
  • 10:00 am- 12:00 pm

 

Dred and Harriet Scott – Federal Court Cases and the U.S. Supreme Court

Part 2 of a 3 part seminar series on legal history.  The second session of the series will deal with the effort of the Scotts to obtain their freedom in the federal courts, with particular emphasis upon the 1858 United States Supreme Court decision that helped moved the country toward the Civil War.

  • Presented by Thomas E. Wack
  • Friday, August 26, 2016
  • 10:00 am- 12:00 pm

 

Important Missouri Court Cases Affecting Desegregation Law, 1938-1973

Part 3 of a 3 part seminar series on legal history.  The subject of the third session of the series will be three cases from Missouri that have been important in the law of desegregation: (1) the case of Lloyd Gaines, an African-American who was allowed admission to the University of Missouri Law School in 1938; (2) the 1948 decision in Shelly v. Kramer, a landmark case that made restrictive covenants in housing based on race unenforceable; and (3) the 1973 ruling in McDonnell Douglas v. Green, that describes the proof necessary to establish employment discrimination and is the most cited case in the history of the federal courts.

  • Presented by Thomas E. Wack
  • Friday, September 9, 2016
  • 10:00 am- 12:00 pm